Month: July 2004

Obama’s rhetoric

The speech of Barack Obama that drew widespread applause is reproduced after the next couple of paragraphs. I found the speech well crafted, appealing to passion and has an element of soothing calmness that has become characteristic of Democratic Party. His intention is clear, to win and be emergent in the power politics. And to garner the required support, he resorts to his own American Dream. Are we soon being reduced to irrational passive dreamers who fancy that multicultural plate will on its own arrange itself neatly with social order even without folks interfering with the political-economic design? Well, here is what Obama thinks:

Studying Obama representation

I found on email a refreshingly different critique on Barack Obama by Malik Al-Arkam. The self-adulation must stop, the author hints. And the same person cannot serve the oppressed and the oppressors at the same time, for the interests will clash eventually, Al-Arkam emphatically states. This may be politically incorrect, but it is politically very relevant. Mr. Obama’s rosy rhetoric ignores American apartheid: To be sure Mr. Barack Obama has many admirable qualities. He is a Black man who has worked long and hard to elevate himself in an intensely racist society. He loves his wife and daughters. He has a social conscience. He has worked to secure civil rights for the downtrodden in Chicago. As a African-American who also beat the odds by fighting my way out of the segregated South and going on to earn an honors degree at Harvard College and as one who lived in East Africa, I can identify with Mr. Obama in several ways. However, an objective analysis of Mr. Obama’s well-crafted keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention …

Political lessons for a perpetual Black activist

Alton H Maddox Jr. writes about the Political lessons for a perpetual Black activist, for the AmNews As Black leaders are biting off their fingers waiting for the start of the Democratic National Convention later this month in Boston, I will be reminiscing about Johnson versus Goldwater in 1964. Because Georgia allowed persons to vote at 18 years of age before the 26th Amendment, this would be my first vote in a presidential election. This election would introduce me to the politics of fear. Barry Goldwater would nuke the world. Lyndon Johnson was the Great White Hope. The same modus operandi is in play today. Only President-select George Bush can save the United States from another 9/11 attack. Homeland Security is busy disseminating color-coded alerts. My father gave me some advice for the next presidential election in 1968. Like myself, he never experienced any obstacle to voting in Coweta County. The reason was simple. Georgia used the white primary system and county officials were indifferent to Black voting preferences. A white, male segregationist would win …

Gil Scott-Heron’s B Movie

Gil Scott-Heron’s B Movie From the album “Reflections” has the lyrics that will stir hearts souls. No wonder he is the Soul Singer. From gun control to corporate wars, Scott-Heron does not spare anything. And thats the reason why his revolution could not be televised. Here is the rest new poet (declaring the dawning of a new age): Well, the first thing I want to say is…”Mandate my ass!”

Offerings

What will I give thee, you are the gift to me How much to adore thee, you mean the love for me When each moment spent are the times cherished To wish you well, which day be chosen by me?   The night’s a façade, the day conceals And my gladness, the stars too miss My feelings how can they know Those greetings on sale and marketed gifts   Who I pray and worship for you? Where do I seek your well being? What do I add to bedeck your day When what I have is you as blessing?   No poem can ever suffice to note Or a painter’s brush can ever coat The shine of my eye, the pride in my heart Words too feeble, and colors delicate   Have loved you to know you And known to have loved you If life has some things to crave for Its to live my life beside you   Never in want will you be, for you are the spring Of all happiness unbound that …