Comments

  • From Sahir Ludhianvi - Communist and a Poet on Fellow Decent Human Beings... (Translated)

    […] Fellow Decent Humans […]

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  • From International (Working) Women's Day Print - Entangled Roots Press on International Women’s Day: Anti-War, Anti-Capitalist Movement to Emancipate All Workers!

    […] In 1917 women workers of Petrograd had organized a mass of 50,000, comprising their fellow male comrades in demanding for “bread, peace and land” and to end the imperialistic world war. All this history is well laid out in Saswat Pattanayak’s article International Women’s Day: Anti-War, Anti-Capitalist Movement to Emancipate All Workers! […]

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  • From Noor Zafar on 2016: Divided We Fall

    Beautifully written, you have managed to condense what the world is in the form of poetry.

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  • From lite far on Eurocentrism as Terrorism

    Fantastic analysis, words cannot describe how accurate they are and how they reflect the current situation in the world.

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  • From Sole Invictus on On Einstein's Acceptance of Communist Russia and Rejection of Zionist Israel

    Thanks for this article. Very insightful.

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  • From Rohith Vemula: Indian Left and the Dalit Student Suicides - Saswat Blog on Medical Strike: Misplaced Sympathies and Denial of Privilege

    […] animosity against Dalits in Indian educational settings have been nothing less than ghastly. All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) is a classic case in point. The Medical strike of 2006 had “merit” students holding placards in broad daylight of Delhi […]

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  • From Rohith Vemula: Indian Left and the Dalit Student Suicides - Saswat Blog on Beyond the Judiciary - Reservation as Reparation

    […] What is it that makes the deans and heads of departments invariably always upper caste Hindus? What is it that sustains a climate where “reservation” is treated as though it is a favor, and n…What is it in academic environment that encourages student politics of dissent, but the dissenting […]

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  • From A. B. Bardhan: Unforgettable Relevance | Orissa Matters on Comrade A B Bardhan, Lal Salam!

    […] Comrade Bardhan had confidence in fellow Indians that they shall reject communal, Hindutva politics … […]

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  • From 2016: Divided We Fall – Saswat Blog on 2015: Of Incidental Revolutions

    […] [2015 || 2014 || 2013 || 2012 || 2011 || 2010 || 2009 || 2008] […]

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  • From Ranjan on Bapa

    An outstanding poet. I can feel the love deep in my hear.
    I can also link this blog with Orissamatters. Great job. Keep going until achieving your mission.

    Ranjan Kumar Sahoo

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  • From Anon on Amiri Baraka: Angry Black Communist, the Soul of the Sun

    Incredible poems. I hadn’t heard of Amiri Baraka before his death, but I will without question read more of his works. Thank you for sharing.

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  • From Bapujee on Amiri Baraka: Angry Black Communist, the Soul of the Sun

    Excellent piece. Thank you for introducing to a wonderful person. Thoroughly enjoyed reading this.

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  • From Satya on Orissa Killer Cyclone 1999: Recollections & Some Lessons for Phailin

    I guess this time govt of orissa did a good job in all aspect and they proved that they learnt a lot from "99" cyclone.

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  • From andrewezito@gmail.com on Photo Essay: Justice Denied. In solidarity with Trayvon Martin

    Nice circus but that is all it is, a circus.

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  • From no-reply@gmail.com on Vande Mataram as a Hindu Hymn

    Baahute tumi maa shaktihRidaye tumi maa bhakti
    tomaara i pratimaa gaDi
    mandire mandire
    TvaM hi Durgaa dashapraharaNadhaariNii
    kamalaa kamaladala vihaariNii
    vaaNii vidyaadaayinii namaami tvaaM
    Where is the problem when the fact is that a majority of the patriots in the pre-independence days were Hindus & Sikhs? And as far as I know there were no Christian (you sound like a convert) patriot and Muslim Patriots were a minority (only a handful) too. I hope there something called “Right to freedom of religion”. BTW it talks not of various religious deities but the Supreme Mother.

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  • From no-reply@gmail.com on Vande Mataram as a Hindu Hymn

    It appears as though bashing Hinduism has become a fad in spite of being truly tolerant and secular at its base. ‘Vande’ literally means ‘I praise’ and not really ‘I bow’. Get your facts straight Mr. Pattanaik and think twice before you level allegations against a man of that stature. It should be kept in mind that bowing to motherland is not really worshiping. One can do so to show respect too just the way Muslims make parikramans around the Kaba to show respect and not in order to worship it.

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  • From moropanttambe@gmail.com on Rape Culture, Capitalism and India

    There’s a girl fighting for her lifeIn a hospital room.
    While in the street the constables scratch their balls.
    And some policemen chase bribes
    And others try to do their jobs and usually fail.
    Everybody’s on the take and everyone steals from the public.
    “What’s wrong with me doing it, everyone does it?”
    Leaders see nothing wrong with leading this farce.
    And still claiming to be leaders.
    If men chase a woman on the street,
    taunting her, it’s her problem,
    or the problem of anyone brave or
    stupid enough to get involved.
    Because we live under the rule of a state that won’t protect us
    and won’t get out of the way.
    So anyone who stands up to this state
    No matter why and no matter how
    They stand up for that girl
    Because we have suffered, she has suffered, and more will die
    as long as we live like this
    without self-respect
    under this half-rule of half-competent and full-corrupt.
    Sweep them all away – all – get rid of those grand Raj buildings.
    Storm not just Vijay Chowk and India Gate.
    Storm the half-acre plots of Lutyens Delhi with crowbars
    Take down the windows, smash the bricks.
    Lay this vicious, callous, senseless raj in ruins.
    Let’s not rest until the police are in flight
    The government buildings are smoking ruins
    And there is a new deal for the people of India
    A new deal
    A new police force
    A new government
    New rules
    New staff
    New salaries
    New regulations
    New zero-tolerance laws against anti-social behaviour
    New laws against corrupt policemen and officials.
    Nothing of the old world that allowed this to happen.
    No peace until then.
    No peace until we and our children and our mothers and our sisters are safe.
    No peace until Sonia Gandhi and Rahul Gandhi and Shinde and Manmohan Singh
    And Sushma Swaraj and Mamata Bannerjee and Narendra Modi
    And every other dung beetle that profited from this shit heap called
    The Government of India
    Has been crushed up into manure
    And forgotten.
    Forever.
    No peace until then.

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  • From bayden_3@hotmail.com on On Einstein's Acceptance of Communist Russia and Rejection of Zionist Israel

    Your article has made me think more about history in general. I enjoyed reading your article and hope to one day be at the stage your at in your writing and also the research behind your article is enlightening.thank you

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  • From leonine55@gmail.com on Jab Tak Hai Jaan :: A tribute to Yash Chopra

    Solidly Delivered.

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  • From tomhykins@gmail.com on Jab Tak Hai Jaan :: A tribute to Yash Chopra

    agree with u… movie was a bit cheesy for my taste..

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  • From tacttent@yahoo.com on Why is Hurricane Sandy a Political Issue?

    Excellent article on the self serving actions of our politicians and the media that aid and abet their low-life photo ops. Also on the refusal of our media to put the truth about this administration’s many inept and devistaating actions on the front pages where they belong.However, I disagree with your blame of capitalism as opposed to human ineptitude and immoral decisions just as I disagree with people who blame a gun for murder. In other words capitalism is not at fault nor corrupt; the conscious corrupt decisions by humans -in this case politicians & media- is what is at fault.
    I know people in my area (Upstate, NY) are putting together drives for food, clothing, flashlights, and such for Sandy victims. So, though you are disgusted with politicians I hope you can offset that with the comfort of knowing your fellow citizens are doing what we can.
    And it is because of capitalism that we have the ability to help.
    In the meantime good luck to you and your neighbors and God bless, should you want his/her blessing.
    Tom M
    PS. Here is a photo op of Bloomberg gone wrong. Personally I enjoyed watching it backfire on him.
    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2012/11/new-yorkers-cuss-out-mayor-bloomberg-when-we-gonna-get-some-fcking-help-video/

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  • From monaliza@telus.net on Remembering Howard Zinn (August 24, 1922 – January 27, 2010)

    Thank you for this excellent article. In the social work field, there is a tendency to shield ourselves from historical and present-day reality (and the positions that we are taking to maintain the status quo by our actions/inactions) by uplifting the charity model as “solutions”. This is a good reading for practitioners and students. Will include on my student reading list.

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  • From ddraut.imwc@gmail.com on India’s Freedom Struggle and Baji Raut, the Youngest Martyr

    Native People’s Party believe in the thoughts and teachings of Dharmatma Kabir, Mahatma Phule, Father of Nation , Mahatma Gandhi and Bharat Bhagya Vidhata Dr. Ambedkar .We have great respect for Baji Raut , the youngest martyr of India. Native People’s Party has started Native HERO Award in the memory of Baji Raut from 2011 .
    Nativist D.D.Raut, President, Native People’s Party
    Massage to Nation : Janeu Chodo Bharat Jodo

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  • From ddraut.imwc@gmail.com on India’s Freedom Struggle and Baji Raut, the Youngest Martyr

    Native People’s Party believe in the thoughts and teachings of Dharmatma Kabir, Mahatma Phule, Father of Nation , Mahatma Gandhi and Bharat Bhagya Vidhata Dr. Ambedkar .We have great respect for Baji Raut , the youngest martyr of India. Native People’s Party has started Native HERO Award in the memory of Baji Raut from 2011 .
    Nativist D.D.Raut, President, Native People’s Party
    Massage to Nation : Janeu Chodo Bharat Jodo

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Jack Baber, apparently, you are reading too much into this blog. How about spending time with those that agree with your love for your favorite politicians? I still think Ahmadinejad and Chavez and Castro make way more sense than some of the folks you seem to be endorsing. If you are so up for freedom and liberty, you should just respect my right to hold my opinion. If you have a blog somewhere, maybe you can post your obamalove there instead of judging me here. Does that make sense?

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  • From Yi1435@gmail.com on Oprah Winfrey, Tommy Hilfiger and Subtle Racism

    british airways is the best airline that i have been into, great crew and great service.;~

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  • From Munet22@yahoo.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Great Blog. Just not sure why I am up in the middle of the night reading this. 🙂 🙂

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  • From wildroller@gmail.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Where’s my comment?Funny how you claim to be such a radical, yet (just like the nasty media / Big Brother machine you profess to be fighting against) you censor this blog. Have you got the balls to allow my comment? Or do you only allow comments from your friends?
    Back to class for you, comrade.

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  • From wildroller@gmail.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Actually, if you look into it , Michael Jackson really did much less than he could have done for the civil rights movement. Apart from “Black or White” (which came relatively late in his career) he never really made any overt references to it. In fact, some would argue that he was actually in denial about his skin colour. If you want to mourn a musician, perhaps James Brown would be more apposite. Listen to the call-and-response chorus of “Say It Loud – I’m Black and I’m Proud”, and the lyric about dying on your feet instead of living on your knees, or the majority of work by Stevie Wonder, or “What’s Going On” by Marvin Gaye, and tell me that “Michael Jackson helped make the election of a Barack Obama possible”… are you serious? What statement did he make about, for example, Rodney King? What overt statements did he make for the black power movement? In fact, Michael Jackson was actually a kind of creepy, sentimental Hollywood figure, whose syrupy and vague statements about the children of the world were brought into sharp relief after the accusations made against him by a child. One of his great friends was Elizabeth Taylor. Does that not tell you anything?I fear that the fact you’re most probably a fan of Michael jackson has clouded your judgement: how you cannot see that he was just a part of the Hollywood machine is beyond me. Over at http://saswat.com/about/ you seem to make rather high-falutin’ claims about yourself as a radical. Ironically, claiming to be “a Human being, Journalist, Generalist, Atheist, Poet, Lover, Communist, Third wave Feminist, LGBT ally, Black Power comrade, Peacenik, Critical media theorist, Radical film critic, Academic non-elite” is rather contradictory: that list seems to me like a protracted self-important hagiography of yourself. That kind of chest-puffing is ironically rather patriarchal. If you stop posing by the tree (the fact that you are involved in something called egojournal.com/ is perhaps another brilliant irony), take the shades off and take down the undergraduate Che Guevara poster from the wall, you’d perhaps realise that you need to get out of America and see the real world. Over here in England, the kind of saccharine, corn-ball, schmaltzy, Disney-esque statements that Michael jackson used to utter, coupled with his apparent denial of his blackness, made him more of a figure of ridicule than somebody to respect. He was certainly no intellectual. Obama perhaps had more dignity than you thought. There’s a recession on: I’d prefer my political leaders to stay away from the celebrity world, and concentrate on the politics. Your post above merely shows how far the left have fallen, and how far the needle is twisted on your moral compass. Case in point: here: http://saswat.com/blog/ahmadinejad_is_the_leader.html you are claiming that “Ahmadinejad is the Leader the World Needs Now!”
    Actually, if you had done the tiniest bit of homework, you’d see the huge hole in this theory. Muslims like him (at least the ones who lean toward the more fundamentalist side of the religious bed) DESPISE the usual cornerstones of the radical left you claim to represent: the right for people to lead a homosexual life, feminism, freedom of speech etc… When I tell you this, which bit of it don’t you understand? Go live in Iran, and see how fast your irrelevant blog gets taken down, comrade. Your “sisters” over there are getting forty lashes for wearing trousers.
    And you moan about Obama?

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  • From kim@aol.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Amen on this post. I was as enthusiastic about Obama’s election to the Presidency as I ever was about Michael Jackson’s incredible talent. I had great respect for both of their achievements. After observing Obama’s demeaning response to the death of a historic, artistic, American legend, my enthusiasm and hope for the Obama presidency is greatly diminished.
    President Clinton paid beautiful respect to the Jackson family over their loss, and the loss for this country. Obama should have taken a lesson from the former president on how to honor *American* artistic exceptionalism.
    While I will continue to hope that Obama does right by the people of this country who helped him get elected, my passion for his presidency is greatly diminished in light of his callousness towards the loss of Michael Jackson. The significance of MJ’s death deserved much more from the leader of this nation, especially given Obama’s racial makeup and the multiracial solidarity that helped lead him into the history books of this great country.
    Al Sharpton was right when he said Michael Jackson helped make the election of a Barack Obama possible. The president should have shown respect based on that fact alone.
    All I can say at this point is, be careful Mr. Obama. The racial tides in this country have been known to ebb and flow, sometimes to great regret of the assimilated who delude themselves into believing they have transcended race. To the surprise of many, MJ understood well the dichotomy that is the American ideal not yet realized. The genius of MJ’s life, is that he worked tirelessly within that duplicitous framework to help bridge the divides that have too long prevented our nation from becoming that more perfect union, and was one of the first to do so globally.
    Michael Jackson deserved much better than you, Mr. President Obama, afforded.

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  • From info@seo-contentwriter.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Great post, Saswat! Extremely Insightful. BO ought to acknowledge MJ’s passing..Thanks for the wonderful post..

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  • From flaxsoy@yahoo.com on Rightist Rants of Vikram Buddhi

    I believe that Vikram Buddhi and his father have suffered an injustice and that people should speak up for him to have a fair and speedy trial and full legal protection for himself and his family while seeking justice.
    I am confused however, as to what his defense is. Is it that he didn’t mean any harm and would never carry out the threats? Or did he not in fact post the messages?
    If it is the former, then the initial reaction of the Secret Service – let him off with a warning – may have sufficed and probably should have sufficed. Delay in getting information from Yahoo and Purdue computer systems does not explain why they changed their stand 3 months later and prosecuted him for a threat that they agreed he had no intention to carry out.
    If it is the latter then the injustice is far worse, indeed worst-nightmarish. Can you really tell who posted something on some of these blogs or message boards? I don’t know.
    Unfortunately many of those who signed the online petition at http://www.petitiononline.com/freevb/petition.html seem ill informed as to what this gentleman may have posted (or not posted). He did not raise a voice for human rights issue, as several petition signers seem to believe. He was not detained “without charge” – he was charged on 11 counts including threatening to kill the President. Nor is his First Amendment right being violated, as this kind of expression, threatening violence is not protected under the First Amendment.
    How does it help the young man’s case if you do not know what you are defending him against? What we must demand is a fair trial and also, in the event that he is found guilty, a punishment that fits the crime. For this the only viable defense seems to be that he had no intention of carrying out the threats, and that he should not be singled out from among the many many people who post as bad or worse threats on the internet. Punishing him is not likely to deter others because of the sheer commonness of such online behaviour. If those who provide forums where this behaviour goes unchecked and is in fact highly encouraged, even to the point of addiction are also held responsible then perhaps it can actually be curbed.
    I hope a more responsible campaign is launched to protect this young man and his family from this injustice.
    See also: http://nwitimes.com/news/local/article_2ae10462-7b15-5c96-a616-7ecd39491024.html
    http://nwitimes.com/news/local/article_bca873a7-42d7-5974-bdbc-f80a300bdfd7.html

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  • From Mgbrook0602@gmail.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Mr. Jackson, an American icon/hero. Yeah right. Clearly he was a talented individual but one whose talent was outshone by his eratic behavior, drug use, and pedophilic tendencies. Those masses in mourning are a vocal minority of America while a silent majority wonders how such a troubled person ever came to be so adored. And how those troubles, serious and detrimental, came to be so quickly forgotten. And lastly I would add that I chuckle at the thought of the leader of the free world being expected to publicly mourn a pop star. This is not American idol, it’s the American government.

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  • From chestyguy@aol.com on On Obama's Refusal to Acknowledge Michael Jackson

    Michael Jackson was possibly the most famous and appreciated man from the United States.I totally agree with you.

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  • From Dancindave54@gmail.com on An Open Letter to President Obama: Against the Rhetoric of Hope

    Have you heard about the Maafa 21 documentary that has just been released? It goes into great detailabout the who, what and how racist attitudes are being perpetuated today and what the ultimate goal of it
    is. the shocking thing is that it has been going on for years under the guise of “helping” the black
    community. You can see a preview at maafa21.com
    The full length documentary was shown twice in DC at the Capitol Visitor Center’s new theater. The second showing included a large contingent from the Black
    Congressional Caucus, as well as, other offices. They were shocked by it.
    I saw it at Pastor Broden’s church last week and there were tears, and gasps. The information just gets more disturbing as it goes on like when Elaine gave her story about how she was sterlized by the
    state against her will when she was 14, or Nixon’s “black bastards” comments.
    If you are interested give one of them a call and they can give you more details.

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  • From nubianations@yahoo.com on An Open Letter to President Obama: Against the Rhetoric of Hope

    Dear Saswat Pattanayak & President Obama,
    Unity is the key to understanding what makes us innately singular in a world of differences. -Fahim Nassar & Monica Young
    What separates people of African Ancestry the most is religion and sexuality. People are failing to see the President Obama does not stand for “Black” people. The government has redefine black, negro, colored, people of color, afro-american and african american several times over but the largest change in the definition came with the election of Obama. What does it means to be black/african american? Why did we have to insert Obama’s possible race into the situation in the first place. Let me move on more pressing subjects.
    Obama, there are still black children being sexually abused, black men still being imprisoned more years for drug conviction than white men for murder, racial profiling, police brutuality, and unwarranted killing of brothers for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Where is our hope when you are addressing the human race but neglecting your wive’s and children’s history and the situation facing african american people of the 21st century.
    I just want to find solutions to some of these problem facing people of african ancestry. Where do I being? I am poor with a good heart and a sound mind but limited resources. It not about me but the next generation etc etc…
    Ywndricka
    ywndricka@yahoo.com

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  • From mike.wilson81@ymail.com on An Open Letter to President Obama: Against the Rhetoric of Hope

    Just passing by.Btw, you website have great content!
    _________________________________
    Making Money $150 An Hour

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on An Open Letter to President Obama: Against the Rhetoric of Hope

    Thank you for the apt observation. However I have not spoken about the march on Washington anywhere in this letter, so I am not sure how to respond to your attempt at clarifying history. I have merely said that were MLK alive today he would not have done a few things which Obama has done. Again, this is what I am just imagining. It has nothing to do with historical reality.
    I am not even sure what Malcolm X would have done or said today. You are quoting John Lewis from Eyes on the Prize series. I am listening to how John Lewis was saying to CNN today that he was crying tears of joy throughout the weekends and how he thinks Dr King’s dream is coming true with Obama’s election.
    Of course Congressman John Lewis is more accepting of Obama today than either you (hopefully) or I. That still will not lead me to ascribe intentions to him or Dr King. I am never going to fall into the trap of comparing Dr King and Malcolm X and debate about who was more radical. In my view, both of them – especially during their later years of lives – were truly committed to causes of social justice. And in my view, Mr Obama – at this stage, and I am not talking about what will happen in future – certainly is hands in gloves with the military industrial complex that is silencing the complexities around racial issues in this country, which is very much alive despite being rendered invisible by the media.
    Thank you for visiting and airing your valuable opinion. I just went through your blog. I humbly disagree on your claim that today marks the beginning of a new era. I think, with the rejection of Cynthia McKinney by the system as a presidential candidate, we have only walked few steps backwards.

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  • From donedeal8@earthlink.net on An Open Letter to President Obama: Against the Rhetoric of Hope

    Liked what you had to say and think it was timely. However, some of your comments about Dr. King lack clear historical reality.
    It is forgotten (conveniently) that Dr. King and others were paid by some very wealthy folks to help them gain control of the march on Washington (Correctly called the farce on Washington by Malcolm X). If you will check the “Eyes on the Prize Series,” there is a section where some of the speakers, including Congressman John Lewis, informed us that they were not allowed to give the speeches they had prepared but were given speeches to read instead. The “March” became a paid for and controlled event that eliminated the grassroots elements that had initially conceived the idea. Something for you to consider…

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  • From mohan_per@yahoo.com on Satyam Scandal :: Ramalinga Raju is not the Problem

    Firstly we had to appreciate raju for he had agreed for the fraud he /his company had been practicing for years:
    Most of us or corporate Heads do practice wrong financial results with the expertise services of the Auditors and Financial Advisors.
    Even a common man in India ( Including Me & you ) at most of the times file or state wrongly for even a mere driving license or voters id card or IT returns or etc.
    This is because of the system Corruption and administrative corruption such issues arise.
    Please do understand that such wrong statements are made either to evade tax or to gain high valued orders or to raise the stock value or as the main to show off false profits and image for social benefits.
    My dear friends let us consider the facts now leaving the Satyam issue and lets see what corporate culture is:
    Can the Government or Media raise their Hands over the correctness of their statements?
    Is it not that our Indian Prime Minister who is stated as the most Honest person had claimed falsely that he is a resident of far east state.
    How Honest are our administrators and Politicians.
    Dear Brothers – RELIANCE GROUP IF SCRUTINISED SHALL BE MAJOR FRAUDSTER GROUP OF THE WORLD
    HOW DID RELIANCE GET THE BASE AT KG BASIN OF ANDHRA PRADESH. IT IS A COMPLETE PROPERTY OF ONGC AND FEW EMPLOYEES HAD DRAFTED THE PLAN TO ALLOCATE THE PORT TO RELIANCE.
    FIRST LET US ALL STOP FLODDING ON FEW SHORT TERM BENEFITS
    JAI JAGAT

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  • From rahulvuyyuri@gmail.com on Satyam Scandal :: Ramalinga Raju is not the Problem

    For all the fraud happenning at satyam for the past few years the ultimate blame goes to Chairman/CEO of the company. Agreed there are working soldiers in it but the sole responsibility is on the Chairman/CEO!!
    There’s a saying “One who got caught is a THIEF and one doesn’t Maharaja or whatever? “

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Satyam Scandal :: Ramalinga Raju is not the Problem

    Raju is unlucky because the couple of hundreds of fortune 500 clients of his are not facing the media wrath now. Nor are the renowned auditors.When I said conscience, of course I was saying with a pinch of irony.
    Whether or not he has realized his sins and errors are outside the argument I am making because I merely see Raju as an element of capitalistic culture that must produce corrupt bosses as him unworthy of the riches. Just as it must produce other bosses of private corporations who earn in millions, but as yet been declaring their innocence.
    Its not about a man who has been “caught”. Its about a system that has been normalized as ideal which in reality must and does produce thieves.

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Satyam Scandal :: Ramalinga Raju is not the Problem

    Right on! And that’s the reason why its important to indicate the components-of/potentials-for financial frauds to take place as a necessary consequence of market capitalism. Private auditors, profiteering CEOs, opportunistic investors and corporate clients remain buddies for mutual benefits.
    Raju is a consequence of culture of capitalistic corruption, not an inventor of the same. But being a collaborator in perpetuating this consequence, he must face legal actions along with the entire team of accomplices (the senior level management as well as the multinational auditors) – that is, if the laws of our lands were ever enacted to pursue battle against the rich class.

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  • From nrich@vsnl.in on Satyam Scandal :: Ramalinga Raju is not the Problem

    I do not see what is ill luck or conscience got to do with Raju’s so-called ‘confession’. I am not inclined to believe that Raju has finally realized his sins and errors and taking the full rap for the fiasco. The (2) billion dollar question is why this confession now? Is there something behind his taking the full credit (pun unintended) for the fraud?
    And about his almost single-handed effort, do read my post http://badrirag.wordpress.com/2009/01/08/one-two-man-fraud/

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  • From contrarianbroodings@gmail.com on Prelude to Mumbai Blasts: Hindu Terrorism

    leave your secular rants till the charges are proved against sadhvi and col. purohit.

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  • From gulam26@gmail.com on End Global Terrorism. Save Mumbai from Hindu Fanatics.

    Saswat is a great friend of Muslims or may be a converted Muslim in disguise. I salute him for writing all great lies in support of Islamic terrorists who attack India. He is Allah incarnate and must be right in condemning Hindus for all the terror attacks which happened in India and all over the world including 9/11 attack on the WORLD TRADE CENTERS in New York. Only he knows that ALQAYDA is a Hindu Organisation and he only can represent this sacred view to Bush and Obama on behalf of we all muslims. He knows that 10 terrorists which came from PAKISTAN were really Hindus and did these terror attacks to defame we Muslims.

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  • From thetimesofbullshit@hotmail.com on Beijing Olympics: A Humanist Success despite Tibetan Terrorism and Western Imperialism

    “…Chinese peoples stood firmly with each other in solidarity and thwarted every such attempt.”
    ha ha! Man, the hyperbole! Goebel would be proud.
    No use sucking up to the Chinese, man! Even the US is today more socialist than them!

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  • From methjam@gmail.com on Beijing Olympics: A Humanist Success despite Tibetan Terrorism and Western Imperialism

    Great post, it was very informative. I think its a must read.

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  • From onejustworld@gmail.com on Beijing Olympics: A Humanist Success despite Tibetan Terrorism and Western Imperialism

    All very interesting and revealing.Here is another contribution on the subject: http://one-just-world.blogspot.com
    Take care
    Veracity

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  • From srikant.malladi@gmail.com on Vande Mataram as a Hindu Hymn

    wonderful writing. its so true that our society has institutionalized servility on every level…family, society, academic. to have a critical, individualistic and anti-establishment POV is enough to brand one as anti-India, anti-Hindu and anti-development in these high – growth and suicide years. more power to you.

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  • From rgn_usr@hotmail.com on Chavez and RCTV: Whose Media is the Question

    Wow, you can feel the love for the commie tyrants.. aaahh..
    No wonder communism is a mental disease and its supporters are so unhinged from reality.
    Look at this people – it seems Chavez was elected with 63% majority and yet he feels threatened by.. ahem.. a friggin TV station. Yes thats right a friggin TV station.
    Because if people see this TV station, the 63% majority which was believed to be wise enough to elect Chavez in the first place will .. hey wait a minute. how many of these ppl who voted for Chavez can even afford a TV?
    The tyrant suppresses free speech for a simple reason – he is threatened and wants to hold on to his chari as tightly as possible. He wants ZERO opposition and that TV channel seems to be offering a sembalance of it. So, adios RCTV.
    The spin put on this simple fact by Saswat would make Sean Hannity and Bill O Reilly blush.

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  • From yussufmz@yahoo.com on A Review of “The Darker Nations”

    enjoyed reading your review. can i use it for my studentes both as an example of how to do a review and to discuss your analisys and of the authors.

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  • From tburroughs@jmail.umd.edu on Chavez and RCTV: Whose Media is the Question

    Saswat,
    You are an evil genius!! LOL!!!!
    I start at a WAY different place, but I agree with your conclusion, if not (completely) the rationale for it.
    VIVA!!! LOL!!!!

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  • From abhi@gmail.com on Chavez and RCTV: Whose Media is the Question

    I think your article is the only one that explains what is going on in Venezuela in context and entirely endorses Chavez’s action. Roy hasnt read your post fully it seems. But what bothers me is why do the revolutionaries resort to law and order as an excuse to govern themselves? Isnt everyone’s law equally applicable and going by that we also might have a UN law about human freedom which Chavez has surely violated. So back to what you said comrade. its a necessity of the revolutionary goals, not some lame legal requirement or other excuses that can be chopped off

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  • From indethinker@yahoo.com on Chavez and RCTV: Whose Media is the Question

    I live in Venezuela and what there is no mention of in your report of is that this whole issue is a matter of law. The license was issued in 1987 with a 20 year life, as stated when the law was written well before chavez, the sitting president has the right to renew or not ! that’s the law, during his reelection campaign he clearly stated he would shut them down when the license was up, yet he still got 63% of the vote. you certainly are doing yourself a disservice writing the above as all it does is reinforce the corporate media lies spread by your “news” companies, and like it or not majority of Venezuelans support Chavez and belief that the US intends to invade or assassinate him, if you think your over stretched military can control this population you’re in for a rude awakening, the barrios around Caracas will make Bagdhad look like a walk in the park.

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  • From murrali78mmf@gmail.com on May 1 Passing By!

    just passing through my memorys i remebered the childerns magazine long back in 1990,s I read them so, i was searching for the images, illustrations, cover if I could get in net nice to find there are many of the who have sead about the magazine, sad to know that there is no site could give some pic. of the memoryes.They were sweet.. they live in the path of old thoughts,

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  • From rgn_usr@hotmail.com on Mumbai Blasts, Hindu Assumptions and What Needs to be Done?

    Saswat, One kind request. Do NOT call me a comrade. I shudder to think of how much harm communism did to this world in its short period of glory,than all the excesses of capitalism put together. And i am not willing to be “comraded”.
    You seem to be having no problem being a leftist, but at the same time you call our Prime Minister, a capitalist. Hmm. If there is NOTHING wrong with being a leftist, than i wonder what could be wrong being a capitalist.
    Hey, when exactly did I quote Coulter, or Rand? Even though Rand was brutally honest about what/who a human being essentially is, i dont agree with all that she said or did.
    I was not too shocked at your rejection of electoral democracy. Very communist indeed. Democracy is again not a perfect system but it is the surest way of throwing Governments out of power and not having permanent masters. I thought communists always wanted to “empower” people. But when you want to give them power to throw Governments out through elections, suddenly the commies become queasy. Who are the people to say who should be the leader of country? Its only the leftists who know what is best for the country and you better leave this important decision to them. Talk about minority elitism !! The communists practices minority elitism at the highest level and YET they are “empowering” people. Talk about doubletalk. George Orwell hit the nail on the head.
    And oh by the way, it is democracy that guarantees you the freedom to express your thoughts,opinons on this blog or any other arena,without the fear that somebody who disagrees with you will try to shut you down. But i guess, you conveniently refuse to acknowledge that. Sweet.
    Your thoughts about Condi Rice/racism was also pretty interesting. Racism may never end. There will always be people who are of a racist notion. So, what?? If this world was perfect there would be no racism, hunger, poverty, terrorism. Yeah, its the utopian world that communists claim to aspire for but HAVE NO IDEA that it will never be achieved. This world will never be perfect.
    But if Condi Rice does get elected President, she would have proved that just the color of her skin did not give her a disadvantage and that the United States has come a long, long way from the days of the Civil War, George Wallace and Strom Thurmand to elect a person of color to the Presidency. Should that be good news or should that be time to get gloomy as to how racism hasnt stopped.? Any fair minded person who has a positive outlook on life would know that a lot of progress has been made.
    Nobody is asking you to sing praises of “your” country, Saswat. Although,i am a bit confused. From your posting, you seem to say that you dont want to belong to any nationality to live to your full potential. But, please dont reveal your true feelings about “nationalities” to the INS especially if you are here as a student or for work. They may not take to your feelings kindly enough – if you know what i mean 😉
    Also, it seems if people in the US or India say that their country sucks, you could be seen standing by their side. Ok. Standing by their side and bitching along with them. That sure will make sure all problems will be resolved. Nice. Also, i dont know how the hell you managed to cover all 50 states and read the minds of 300 million people. Never mind, i wont ask you about India’s One Billion either.
    Please dont be so elitist to say the people have been fooled into voting for this or that administration. Do you think every one who votes for a Government actually believes that every thing will become allright. No. But at the very least, they are thankful that the choice was left to THEM and not the Communist Politburo as it is happening in China, Cuba, North Korea and any other stalinist state.
    Who exactly is revealing fascist brands of patriotism here? Can you elucidate. I am sure that people in India are not happy with the way their administration is handling the situation in the states that you mentioned, but how does that affect my love for my country? If you by your own admission do not consider the PM to be representative of the state, why should you consider the ENTIRE country to be representative of his/her actions and therefore condemn every citizen. Can we condemn INDIA for what Indira Gandhi did during the Emergency? How silly would that be?
    India is fanatical. Its the worst country in the world. Its horrible. And I will change it by whining about it.
    Your joke about how radical Islam helped win India’s freedom is sick. What exactly were Gandhi, Nehru, Desai, Rajendra Prasad,Sardar Patel,Maulana Azad, regional leaders like Barathi, Kamaraj,V.O.Chidambaram Pillai, millions and millions of people who fought peacefully their entire lives for India’s Independence doing? Who do you think i will be grateful to? And it seems we should be brushing up our history. The first chance the muslim league got, they demanded a separate country way before we even became independent !!
    The only leader from “pakistan’s side” who ever loved India as one country was a true noble soul, Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, also known as Frontier Gandhi.And he could never live with the fact that the country was partioned. And you did not mention any of these leaders ONCE. Wow.
    Shiv Sena, from being a perpetrator of communal conflict has now become a terrorist organization according to “several commision reports”. Yeah, i bet they were the ones who struck Mumbai with bomb blasts in 1993 when Dawood Ibrahim was soundly sleeping in his house. Saswat, have you thought about the possibility of Shiv Sena being the behind the terrorist problems in Kashmir, Hyderabad too.? There must be some commision report to that effect. Look it up.
    Its been an absolute blast, coming to this blog – no pun intended. Just when i thought, this must be just another blog, i was proved wrong. I am glad i stopped by. As i said before
    naivete of the communists never seems to surprise me.
    Saswat, have you ever wondered how Russia a former communist state now has a flat tax system which cannot be implemented even in the most capitalist country in the world? Or as to how China has welcomed capital from the “foreign devil” and is more capitalistic than India can ever be? Or as to how badly North korea and cuba have floundered that its citizens try their best to flee the tyranny of living in those countries at the first possible chance?
    Looks like communism is taking a break. for ever. THANK GOD for that.

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  • From indre.varma@wanadoo.nl on Rightist Rants of Vikram Buddhi

    I don’t know the gay Vikram Buddhi. What I know is that he is a Hero. Here among young University students in Holland. They talk about him , so I visited the web to get hold of him.
    Varma

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  • From itsmechintan@yahoo.com on Medha Patkar: Revolutionary in a Fortress

    Hi Saswat!Even I liked Medha’s approach and the cause for which she is fighting. But what do you have to say about this article->
    http://indianexpress.com/story/2887.html
    Regards,
    Chintan
    http://o3.indiatimes.com/myviewsonnews

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  • From jyoti@yahoo.com on Madhusudan Das, Mahatma Gandhi and Manual Working Class

    Even though Madhubabu is the founder of Orissa, there is not much resources on him on the net. thank u for this post. I always thought Gokhle was spiritual guru of Gandhiji, thanks to orissa govt which doesnt even recognise madhubabu’s contributions. if madhubabu talked about promoting oriya, you should see where we are now with naveen as a cm who has no knowledge of oriya…..”alo sakhi, apana mahata aape rakhi”…kahaku aau kahiba?

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  • From pentoanu@yahoo.com on Madhusudan Das, Mahatma Gandhi and Manual Working Class

    “Madhubabu had set before Gandhi an example, which the latter would continuously refer to, while defining essence of what a human being should aspire for.” -absorbing, to say the least… and the aspiration continues…

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Nepal: Ode to Revolution!

    Thanks for the note.That’s aptly phrased..”installments”…and hence the irony..!
    Because quite often, “installment freedom” normalizes illusions, whereas an “absent freedom” sets stage for resistance.
    Frederick Douglas said once, “not all movement is progress.”
    The royals need to hand over their usurped palaces to peoples for public use where peoples’ constitutions can be drafted…not only in Nepal, but even in Sweden…
    till then, actual human progress remains miles away..thankfully, ahead of us..

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  • From mahesh.poudyal@gmail.com on Nepal: Whose side are you on?

    Saswat, what can I say? You have probably hit nail right on the head with your analysis of India’s approach (and the state’s line) on Nepali politics. With regards to Shayam Sharan’s “we’re with the people” statement, again I think pessimism is probably right placed. But, I still have to be optimistic – just because, its probably the first time that a top Indian diplomat has had to retract the state’s line on Nepali issue expressed just 24 hrs prior!

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  • From mahesh.poudyal@gmail.com on Nepal: Ode to Revolution!

    couldn’t agree with you more here! it seems we’ll only get freedom in “installments”.

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Nepal: Whose side are you on?

    You are right, Mahesh.My few degrees of disagreement with your optimism are not as much shades of disappointments (on the contrary, I believe that people really made India “retract” and that by itself is a huge accomplishment), as they are of skepticism…
    And, my position as someone not thoroughly convinced does not come so much from an understanding that democracy will not work (like Churchil’s analogy for India’s independence), as from an understanding that much bigger counter-revolutionary, reactionary forces are working constantly to dismantle peoples’ democracies…
    All the same, lets rejoice, one cause at a time!

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  • From girlunfettered@gmail.com on Nepal Burning!

    That was an excellent post!
    Everyday I read the papers and wonder if I will witness living history – will the Nepalese dream of democracy finally come true?
    It’s sad that my own country is hypocritical and does not fully extend support to this movement, but I hope things don’t stop until true democracy finally arrives in Nepal.

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  • From mahesh.poudyal@gmail.com on Nepal Burning!

    I wonder if our Big Brother wants to be on the people’s side now…just saw this:‘It’s up to the people of Nepal to decide their future political arrangement’ – Shyam Sharan, Foreign Secretary, India

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  • From mahesh.poudyal@gmail.com on Nepal Burning!

    Saswat, sorry for being a bit rash in my earlier comment. I guess, I hadn’t discovered your blog when you wrote that post nearly a year ago!
    I also think it might be that “hindu factor” which is keeping most of the mainstream Indian media aloof in their coverage of anti-monarchy demonstrations of the past two weeks or so. May be this is where the non-mainstream media, like this blog, should come in to fill the void.
    Anyway, thanks for responding promptly and hope to see more of your commentary on issues relating Nepal (and of course Nepal-India relations!).

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Nepal Burning!

    Mahesh, thanks for the thoughtful reflection.Nepal deserves the attention that we have, especially people from India, collectively failed to provide.
    First in terms of geographical hegemony(–I clearly remember how Madhuri Dixit was perceiving Nepal as an integral part of India.)
    Second, the Hindu-ness of Nepal is often construed as an Indian phenomenon. Hence the resentment to dethrone a Hindu king…I wonder if it was a Muslim ruler, what would be India’s reaction by now…!
    Of course I will run quite a few more comments on this country of brave peoples. In the past, I had carried a small post about Nepal, if i rememeber…
    Its here:
    http://saswat.com/blog/index.php/2005/05/26/who-is-afraid-of-a-human-rights-watcher/
    Greetings!

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  • From mahesh.poudyal@gmail.com on Nepal Burning!

    Saswat, finally… thou have spoken on Nepal finally! Having been following your blog, especially your writings on political issues for a while, I always wondered if you would ever care to write about your neighbouring country. Although short, you have finally jotted something and kudos to you for that…and hey, pictures tell a thousands words…no wonder they have done just that! Cheers!

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  • From icdvocamisra@yahoo.com on Oprah Winfrey, Tommy Hilfiger and Subtle Racism

    HiCouple of remarks to the opinions of Mr. Sid. First off, the fact is not that there are no non-brahmins who could perform the religious rituals appropriately or chant the Sanskrit shlokas, the fact rather is that non-brahmins are NOT allowed to do so. Please check which Hindu temple or ceremony can be presided by a non-brahmin, NON. There have been some reformations in the Hindu system over the time never eliminating the vices inherent in the religion, e.g. caste system. Since the last couple of years in some places (in South India) Brahmin women are allowed to perform rituals in public. And it is fallacious to assume someone to be incapable of doing something if the person or ‘a section people’ have never been given a chance to do the task. And even if a Brahmin, supposedly specialized in performing rituals and chanting shlokas is ‘stupid’ and has no clue what he is uttering, the very fact that he bears a Brahmin last name absolves him of all stupidity and the ceremonies become ‘auspicious’ simply by the presence of his grace.
    A similar argument can be placed in favor of reservations. Reservations are necessary for the underprivileged section of the society; especially that section which has been underprivileged for generations owing to the wretched caste discrimination; & unfortunately still continues in all sectors of the Indian society. The moment someone identifies with a caste as per the family name, we know that caste system exists and is flourishing. For the so called SCST and Other Backward Castes, they should not only be entitled to reservations but they should snatch their rights from the ruling class (formed mostly by upper castes) and from the society that has rendered them disadvantaged for centuries. They are entitled because they require the time and platform to stand at par with the rest of us (the so called pathetic upper castes). We should not expect them to perform at par with us, until they have had their share of opportunities & privileges as a ‘people’ at least for next couple of centuries to compensate for the abject discrimination and disadvantages they have been relegated to by the upper castes. If the upper castes are not happy with the products of reservations they should only curse themselves and their ancestors who have instilled such ridiculous system, the patriarchal & caste system, which has created such an imbalanced society. And they have the audacity to complain about reservations on matter of biased meritocracy?
    As per the requirement for ‘changing the religion’, there is no such thing….in name of reforms people just try to become little humane than they were before, which is good in a way. The nature of organized religion is to separate, discriminate, and maintain the hierarchy in order for the privileged to keep enjoying the benefits of such a system.

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  • From jonathon@gmail.com on Liberal Bias for War in Iran

    Good points, Saswat. But how do you justify the nuclear proliferation, since you also claim to be a pacifist? Or am I only assuming?

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  • From frnd4eons@yahoo.com on Oprah Winfrey, Tommy Hilfiger and Subtle Racism

    Hi Saswat,
    I got the same mail today. I just wanted to check what the truth was and luckily found out. I really don’t know why such things are always sent and why people forward things without checking out the truth. I got this from a friend of mine now reciding in US. Of course, we don’t know the origins of that letter.
    I agree with your understanding of racism. I am a Telugu brahmin and agree that we still follow the same practices. It hurts, but truth is always true. We don’t invite any non-brahmins to organize our festivals and functions. But I also ask you how many such people are capable of doing that? If we come to know about a non-brahmin doing great work at temples, we would be happy to invite him rather than a stupid brahmin who doesn’t even know how to properly utter words. The reason these practices were and are still being done by brahmins is the belief that they do things well, not just becuase they are brahmins. This, at least is my knowledge of religion and religious practices. There is a very think line between tradition and practices. To change things, you need to change religion.
    However, I disagree with one thing that you say about reservations. You say that we brahmins ourselves define the word ‘merit’ and demand that reservations be cut. I suggest you rethink on this. i wonder what you say to the proposed reservations in IITs and IIMs. Resrvation is never a solution. What you’ll be getting from the elite is scum. Think about it.
    Sid

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  • From pss2009@hotmail.com on Recalling Bhagat Singh

    why is this kind of material absent from the school text books?

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  • From shiva81@mac.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    Here is my story. I came to this country 25 years ago on a “FI” foreign student visa. I was a “foreign student” then at a large midwestern university. In the years that followed, I was reinvented several times as “heathen,” “east indian,” “third world citizen,” “woman of color,” “asian/other,” “indian american,” and “south asian.” I finally got my “green card,” and became a “resident alien” (note the built in irony of being both resident and alien, although I am sure the INS of those days was not particularly given to ironic nuances or humor,) and I became a lean anagram in my home country: NRI (NON-Resident Indian)–where I retained some sense of my identity and only my “space” was dislocated. But as I traverse spaces and continents, I am haunted by the paradox of being a “resident alien” in a country that has now been “home” for exactly as long as the “home” I grew up in where I have become simply “non resident” but remain “Indian.”
    The purpose of this rather long personal narrative is to gesture to the fact that despite my years of community activism and work here, and paying Social Security and Taxes even as a “foreign student’ when I had every intention of going back, there remains the distinct sense of “uneasy belonging.” And my narrative is “privileged” coming as I did for “graduate work” and fulfilling all those requirments being asked today: I worked; I contributed to the local economy; I learned English; and I have never violated the law (although residents who are not aliens may CHOOSE to do any of the foregoing without an issue).
    Framing the issue now as “illegal immigrants” rather than as the historically more accurate frame of Immigration provides us with pause. I think viewing the immigration issue via the paradigm of Black s and Native Americans serves no purpose, since neither of those groups were “immigrants”–one was erased; and the other enslaved–and neither came here as millions of immigrants do ….
    Quite apart from the fact that economics has always been the underlying factor for immigration….the pilgrims did not come for religious freedom alone, but cos they were one of the poorest back home; and Columbus, if memory serves me right, came to make his “fortune” which he did.
    So what is it that we are talking about when we glorify our “huddled masses” of the past and the “inglorious border crossing masses” of the present?

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    Maybe its time to revisit North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Much of Mexico’s ills are actually created. Again, on purpose.
    Following is “A Letter from Louis Proyect to Paul Krugman” dated March 27.
    Dear Paul Krugman,
    I was dumbfounded to read your op-ed piece in the NY Times today echoing
    many of the themes of the nativist right.
    You refer to a number of “facts” that should strengthen the case for a
    “need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” They include:
    1. A questioning of the economic benefits immigrants bring to the economy,
    which in your estimation has raised the total income of native-born
    Americans by no more than a fraction of 1 percent since 1980.
    2. An assertion that immigrant workers have depressed the wages of
    unskilled native-born workers, such as U.S. high school dropouts, who would
    earn as much as 8 percent more if it weren’t for Mexican immigration.
    3. Worries about low-skill immigrants threatening to unravel the safety net
    of the U.S. welfare state by taking advantage of our generous medical care
    and educational system.
    Although I understand that you have earned many awards for your writings
    and have been appointed to some of the most prestigious universities in the
    U.S., I would have to give you a failing grade for omitting the most
    important economic factor in the immigration debate. I speak specifically
    of your failure to examine *why* people such as the Mexicans pour into the
    United States in search of jobs. By calling for stricter enforcement
    (implicit in your demand that the “inflow of low-skill immigrants” be
    reduced) without examining the root cause of the flight from Mexico and
    other such countries, you are adopting the same kind of stance as
    politicians who want to crack down on Islamic terrorism without looking at
    the oppressive conditions that breed extremism.
    Fundamentally, immigration is a result of too few jobs in Mexico and
    elsewhere. People come to the U.S. because it is preferable to starvation.
    Free trade agreements of one sort or another have devastated the Latin
    American economies. The real solution to reducing immigration is economic
    development, not Draconian laws.
    And why have jobs disappeared in Mexico? It is because the U.S. has
    disappeared them. When NAFTA began, nearly 8 million people were involved
    in farming, but that number fell to approximately 6.5 million by 2003,
    according to a report on the Public Citizen website
    (http://www.citizen.org/trade/nafta/).
    One can surmise that in the succeeding 3 years, things could have only
    gotten worse.
    Turning the clock back 6 years to July 5, 2000, you wrote a column hailing
    the election of Vicente Fox which you described as a “cause for rejoicing,
    not just for Mexico, but for everyone who hopes that this time around we
    may be getting globalization right.” You also saw it as a vindication for
    NAFTA.
    Turning the clock back another 3 years to February 13, 1997, we find you
    boosting globalization just like your colleague Tom Friedman. In making
    your own case for “the world is flat,” you scoff at worries about job loss
    in the U.S.:
    “Of course, international competition plays a role in some downsizings, but
    as Newsweek’s list makes clear, it is hardly the most important cause of
    the phenomenon. To my knowledge there are no Japanese keiretsu competing to
    carry my long-distance calls or South Korean conglomerates offering me
    local service. Nor have many Americans started buying their home appliances
    at Mexican stores or smoking French cigarettes.”
    However, this is a rather U.S.-centric view of the problem which ignores
    the impact of globalization on other countries. By focusing on whether
    Americans will buy home appliances at Mexican stores, you seem to miss the
    other side of the equation, namely the impact of free trade *inside* Mexico
    rather than inside the U.S.
    An October 30, 2005 St. Louis Post-Dispatch article filled in the details
    that were woefully neglected in your op-ed pieces:
    Alonzo Moran earns more money driving a fork-lift in a cotton gin in
    Missouri’s Bootheel than he could make in almost any job back home in Mexico.
    But after 13 months as a migrant farm worker, Moran is eager to return to
    the 30 acres he owns in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas.
    There, his land lies fallow, not worth planting because of depressed corn
    prices he blames on the North American Free Trade Agreement.
    “What is my dream for the future? I want corn prices to be high again so I
    can go back to Mexico to farm,” said Moran, 42. “But I don’t know if that
    will happen”
    There are many reasons for the recent record migration from Mexico to the
    United States. But many Mexicans say a prime motivation is the difficulty
    in making a living on small farms in rural Mexico.
    A favorite destination is Missouri, where migrants — legal and illegal —
    find farm work in fields and slaughterhouses.
    Many stay. From 2000 to 2004 alone, Missouri’s Hispanic population —
    mainly Mexican — grew by nearly 25 percent, after a 92 percent increase
    from 1990-2000, according to U.S. Census data.
    Illinois’ Hispanic population grew 16 percent in the first four years of
    this decade after a 96 percent increase in the ’90s.
    And those are just the Hispanics who get counted.
    ….

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  • From icdvocamisra@yahoo.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    Hi RichardI am extremely sorry if my comment was insulting. It was not meant to be and that is the reason why I wrote it in third person and hinted that what you were airing may be may be the impact of the mainstream views surrounding us. For example, the word ‘alien’ has not been your invention for terming people who are not born in the US, and it is unfortunate that such a term is used for human beings. I stand by my view points, which are nor merely my opinions.
    As regarding the ‘alien criminals’, we need to look at the percentage of them and their contribution to crime rate as opposed to the total crime rate in the US. And how much safer will the country be without them? And again, how will one distinguish who has committed a crime, who has the potential to, and who are hard working illegal immigrants, to grant legal status when they have never been documented? As for the ‘terrorists’ of the 9-11; immigration violations or illegal status does not prove criminality and neither does affiliation to an Islamic fundamentalist group. And as regards Al Qaeda, please find out how the group originated and prospered, and you will know how the US government is responsible for that too!!
    United States, per se, when we are talking about the millions of individuals residing ‘legally’ in the country, may not be directly blamed for the economic conditions of the countries’ in questions. However, the political power structure and the military industrial basis of the US economy are definitely to be held responsible for much of the economic crises of those countries. Corruption is a dynamic and multilayered phenomenon that grips almost all governments, including the US. However, again, a system to get corrupted requires prerequisites and powerful support structure to maintain it. So the debate regarding the corrupt Mexican government is another ball game and the US interventions of course is the powerful structure that lends support for its persistence.
    Finally, debates are not to be misconstrued as personal attacks. It is only through candid debate, passionate arguments, and heated discussions that we can exchange information, learn and benefit from forums like this.

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  • From rikmrk1@peoplepc.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    One final thing, Amrita. You wrote that “He conveniently forgets that immigrants and non-immigrants without a history of crime were responsible for the recent terror attacks”. For your information, the 19 conspiring hijackers who carried out the attacks on 9-11-01 were affiliated with AL-QUAEDA, an islamic terrorist group. Three of those terrorists were here ILLEGALLY, AND TWO OF THEM HAD PREVIOUS IMMIGRATION VIOLATIONS. Therefore, your remark is hardly accurate.

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  • From rikmrk1@peoplepc.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    To Amrita. You are entitled to your opinion. You want to disagree with me, fine. But why don’t you address your remarks directly to me? Why refer to me in the third person? I consider that insulting and condescending!! And you also insulted my intelligence, which I find very offensive!!!!! I suppose agreeing to disagree agreeably is foreign to your nature. My advice to you is to have more consideration for others who don’t subscribe to your views. Obviously You don’t! You derided my point of view and condemmed it! You also distorted it. For example, I DID NOT WRITE THAT THE HARD WORKING ALIENS SHOULD BE GIVEN A GREEN CARD, afterwhich you remarked in parenthesis ( They are not even considered humans). I wrote, “I am in favor of granting green card status to illegal immigrants who have no trouble with the law and respect their neighbors and neighborhoods. Alot of these folks are hard working individuals who came here for a better way of life. And I do not have a problem with that”. How dare you imply that I don’t consider illegal aliens human! That remark is not only inaccurate, but arrogant and insulting! How dare you?! And I do believe that we would be safer without alien criminals. The ones who are committing violent acts of crime against innocent people. I forgot that you used parenthesis when typing “alien criminals”. So as far as you’re concerned, they’re innocent and above reproach. I beg to differ! You are obviously in favor of open borders and that the United States is to blame for what illegal aliens are going through. I got that impression after reading the following sentence you wrote “And why should the borders be sealed for people who are desperately seeking livelihood after the U.S. crossed the borders into their countries and ravaged their means of survival?”I totally disagree with that. I suppose the United States is to blame for the corrupt Mexican Government under Vincente Fox. YOU MAY BELLIEVE THAT, I DO NOT. If Fox truly cared about his people, and alleviated the poverty that is so widespread in Mexico, many of the illegal aliens would not be here, plain and simple. Again I do not have a problem with Mexicans, Chinese, Japanese and other people from other nations who want to come here for a better way of life. But it has to be done legally. I could go on, but I have written enough. Again, I am completely and totally insulted by your reply to my original posting. It is not necessary to be insulting. You really shouldn’t.

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  • From icdvocamisra@yahoo.com on Rang De Basanti: The Neo-Colonial Success Story

    I agree that the movie is a well made movie….however while critiquing a movie (regarded as being of social significance) we need to analyze why the movie was made, what purpose did it serve, and did it do justice to the cause it was espousing.RDB, of course is not meant for the aam junta, and probably now-a-days movie makers are avoiding the aam junta deliberately. Because movies that cater to the taste of so called middle-class, higher-middle class, and rich people are the ones which mint money overseas. Movies which show the ‘traditional’ Indian values, family systems, and dogmatic rituals are craved for by NRIs and second/third generation youths of Indian origin.
    Anyways coming back to RDB, it reflects the shallowness and hopelessness of most educated youths from the middle-class and rich families. These youths do not have to worry about food, clothing and shelter or shouldering the responsibility of their families. Now those youths who are not hailing from rich families and are not in a technical field (engineering, medical etc.) or expensive fields (MBA, Fashion designing etc) or expensive schools (St Stephens, Lady Shreeram etc.) have worries very different than the RDB youths.
    If the movie was to inspire the young generation, I think it must have but inspired to do what? Are the youths a bunch of ‘inspired idiots’ now?
    The issues highlighted in the movie, rampant corruption in the highest government offices of the country and the disinterest of the leaders to improve the condition of the people, are facts that people live every passing day. There are agitators and activists working against it like Anna Hazare. Even after the Tehelka exposure the youths of the country could not wake up…and a movie like RDB awakens a generation!!?!!
    The inspiring effect of the movie was not the enlightment factor but the sensationalism factor, the white lady (who understands the Indian freedom struggle), the disillusioned funky youths turning into patriots, Aamir Khan (!!),the lathi charge, the tragic & violent death of the handsome laughing youths and fauji etc…….
    If Indian youths are not able to identify with the reasonings, sacrifices, and struggles of the revolutionary freedom fighters after studying history, that is a shame. And if a commercial hindi movie is being considered successful for inspiring them, that is ironic.
    When Raghu says that RDB has successfully inspired the youths to change the country, I would want to know how is the change going to occur?
    RDB would have done more justice to the cause of awakening the youths by highlighting the circumstances, religious, social and political, that is rendering, an otherwise vibrant youth listless and ineffective. That would have helped the educated youths (who are getting inspired by RDB like movies) to recognize the root causes of corruption, poverty, and hopelessness. Understanding would promote proper education in order to build the foundation to gradually eliminate the evils from their roots. I agree with the author of the blog, when he says that killing of corrupt individual/s will not provide any relief. Because as long as a system that perpetuates corruption is intact, the answer can never be sought in killing corrupt officials sporadically.

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Oprah Winfrey, Tommy Hilfiger and Subtle Racism

    Johnetta:Thanks for responding.
    I have already answered to your concern: “They even offer personal examples of their past lives and how gloriously they have left them behind (in other words, left behind the poverty and the poor people).”
    If you would have cited what was done by Oprah to actually cause a systematic shift in other poor people who share her past, then that would have been really helpful.
    thanks,
    Saswat

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Rang De Basanti: The Neo-Colonial Success Story

    Dear Raghu:Thanks for your thoughtful response. Let me attempt at responding.
    Anyone who invests 3 hours of her or his time in watching a film is entitled to an analysis of how the time was spent/invested/wasted. If the numerous praises for the movie can be valid, few criticisms should also be taken in the intended spirit. Hence it’s unfair to accuse my purpose of going to a movie just because you have a different take on the movie.
    Secondly its also in a bad taste to say that the target audience was the educated youth. You can only say that if the tickets were restricted to people who could provide proof of graduation. Even there views will differ, since many people in the physical sciences think the liberal arts students are uneducated etc. I think you reflect an elitist bias of assuming that educated youth are any better than illiterate people.
    I have stated severally in previous posts that I refuse to own the concept of middle class in India, and my guess is you are not familiar with this author’s orientation before attempting to critique him. I did not grow up with booze and jeeps, so I guess we have some issues here as to how you view a rich kid. Moreover, your line “U tell that that the poor struggle for decent education but think about their attitude towards society” is an ill-informed sentence. Precisely because the poor’s attitude of frustration necessarily is caused from the circumstantial hopelessness, not from the fatigue from late night booze parties.
    About Bhagat Singh, I think all the movies about him were very poorly made, based on false notions (I have cited links to support the claim). And dear Raghu, a film does not succeed because people suddenly become smart to understand a good cinema, but because of several other things. Distribution policies, the commercial marketing and trade networking that ranges from a small village to a big town. Not all movies, and certainly the best of art cinemas don’t get released in villages, because the director is not backed by rich investors, not because they make rotten movies. Remember people love all crash songs (and Himesh Reshammiya is the best music director today!) because of the way the films get packaged and marketed, not because they are necessarily good.
    Every filmmaker is a researcher. And an active cultural anthropologist if she or he visits a domain that’s not familiar. One does not need to enroll in a PhD program to do research. Every paanwaala who talks to dozens of people about local politicians is a researcher on people’s attitude to politics, if you know what I mean. Don’t constrict your thoughts to boundaries. I am not a fool to know that Sue did not have a degree, but I guess you didn’t get why I said she was researching (even a selection of people to shout Vande Mataram in line of her grandfather’s diary as secondary material is part of research, ok?)
    When you say “the struggle of independence was against the British empire and not the British people,” you are right. But only partially. Because first I never wanted our five friends to attack Sue, the way I would have wanted Indians those days to attack the British officers. Its not my hate towards Sue that’s apparent anywhere. Its my sorrow that our five friends missed an opportunity to get the answer from this well meaning woman about why her grandfather was there to begin with. And yes, I still maintain that our friends should have surely showed some passionate anger towards the jailor somewhere in their conversations with Sue. If they could identify with Bhagat Singh (nothing less…), they should have showed the anger a bit too against the kind of people he was against. Too bad, our hero was instead busy flirting around with the jailor’s granddaughter.
    About your line: “no revolution starts with a strategic effort and organized mass efforts. every revolution starting point is arbitrary phases of anger of different people.” We are from different strands, I am sure. Your idea of a revolution is owing its roots to anarchism, which again was never explored in this movie either. Mine rests with the scientific socialism, practiced by revolutionary figures from Lenin to Mao to Castro to Che to Chavez. And you will find they were great organizers and strategists. Even after citing Bhagat Singh talking about strategies as starting point of revolution, if you don’t agree, that’s very fine. But that way you will only be condemning the same hero you wish to glorify. And that’s precisely what the movie has done.
    You say, “The people who kill the defense minister are common people ,they are not the philosophers.” First of all you are quoting a movie as though that were some historical truth. And I wonder when did I ever say you need to be a philosopher to do revolutionary strategies. Quite the contrary, remember Marx say, “Philosophers have only hitherto interpreted the world. The point is to change it.” Activists organize, not philosophize.
    About your dreams of changing the country by leaving the “AAM janatha” behind, all the best. I like your optimism and I am very glad that “educated youths” like you are now coming forward to change the country. Although I would prefer the common masses to participate in the larger gamut in an organized manner, I will any day support you in any of your noble endeavors.
    I am happy to see your response and your most patient reading of the post. My sincere thanks. Stop by when you can.
    Saswat

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  • From johnetta@gmail.com on Oprah Winfrey, Tommy Hilfiger and Subtle Racism

    Interesting observations. Do you really believe Oprah is doing a disservice? You should look into her biography to see what all she has gone through.

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  • From icdvocamisra@yahoo.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    Oh! I missed the ‘portable nuke’ part…but what can I say…hahahaha!

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  • From icdvocamisra@yahoo.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    I feel this reply has been written only based on opinion sans any research or deeper understanding of the immigration issues in the US, the courses that law & order takes on people of the minority communities, and the injustice that is inflicted on the ‘illegal’ immigrants on an every day basis. I feel that the opinions are based on mainstream views (of politicians and news channels) that are being hammered into the publics’ consciousness. Furthermore, he did not read the article carefully enough to understand the nuances that already have negated his statements.First off, he agrees that the hard working ‘aliens’ (they are not even considered humans!) should be given green card, as if there is a committee to look out for the ‘hard working illegal immigrants’ and do the needful. And then he says the illegal immigrants who hate the US commit crimes and should be thrown out of the country to restrict terrorist attacks (is it a joke!). He conveniently forgets that immigrants and non-immigrants without a history of crime were responsible for the recent terror attacks. Hatred for US does not turn people into criminals. Social, economic, and political conditions create the circumstances wherein people are more likely to commit crimes or adopt violent methods to assert themselves (like the terrorists). Following this he implies that US would be safer without the ‘alien criminals’, a logic that is so fallacious that no one needs to even elaborate as to why it is.
    Seal the borders, whose prerogative is that? If it is necessary, don’t you think a powerful and rich country like the US could have done that by now? And why should the borders be sealed for people who are desperately seeking livelihood after US crossed the borders into their countries and ravaged their means of survival? If the US industries and politicians have the right to get richer and more powerful at the cost of other countries, then it is the right of all the effected people of the concerned countries to come to this land and demand their rightful share (they are getting crap and still the US officials and concerned citizens have a problem with them).
    If someone should be a concerned citizen, the person has to be well educated first on the issues he/she is opining on.

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  • From raghukirann@yahoo.com on Rang De Basanti: The Neo-Colonial Success Story

    hi, i dont know how u saw the movie,it appears that the only motive u went to the movie was to critisize it.u talk about the movie for not catering to the masses,but i guess most films has its own target audience and in this case it is the educated youth.
    u call that it is a story of the rich and spoilt kids,but i guess there was only one who was rich in that gang and all others come from middle class and their attitude and thinking towards the society and history is the same as the educated people attitude today from all backgrounds.
    u tell that that the poor struggle for decent education but think about their attitude towards society.
    comming to history,u talk the rich spoilt janata doesnt know national heoroes.then think of the educated people in small twons,for them getting good education is itself difficult.think about their resourses.there have been no. of films on bhagat singh but all of them floped because no one wants to see bhagat singh because they think he is irrevelent today ,no one wanrs to know history becausethey think it is irrevelent(i am talking of normal educated student and not of a PHD student).the reason why RDB sucseeded is that the youth could identify bhagat singh as the 5 people in the film did ,because it showed that bhagat singh is a normal peorson as the youth except that he has a misiion and he was more enlighterned .
    comming to SUE,i guess this was the chrecter u hated most.she didnt come 2 india for a research as u said how anthropologists come here and do research.she came here with a script to shoot a documentary and not for research.u tell that the 5 people never critisize their grand father,i guess no one criticises british people.thestuggle of indepedence was against the british empire and not the brtish people.
    comming to the climax,no revolution starts with a strategic effort and organised mass efforts.every revolution starting point is arbitrary phases of anger of different people.it need not be great thinkers like bhagar singh or mahatma ghandhi.these incidents ignite people and wakes up the thinkers.take any revolution u will find this,even in indian independence struggle.the people who kill the defence minister are common people ,they are not the philosophers.
    now i tell u why i like the movie, because it communicates with the present day educated youth of all classes.the future of the country is not in the hands of AAM janata but with the educated people,these are the people who can bring a chance in the society and to the lives of AAM janatha.no country is perfect it is we the people who has to make it a better place,and this is only possible if we satop complaining and start partisipating in our countys development. the film gives hope to the youth that we can change the country
    and it suceeds.
    raghu.

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  • From rikmrk1@peoplepc.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    First of all, my ancestors came to the United States from Northern Ireland, and Slovakia. We are a nation of immigrants. However, illegal immigration must be stopped and we must adhere to the laws in effect. I am in favor of granting green card status to illegal immigrants who have no trouble with the law, and respect their neighbors and neighborhoods. Alot of these folks are hard-working individuals who came here for a better way of life. And I do not have a problem with that.On the other hand, there are alot of illegal immigrants in this nation WHO HATE THE UNITED STATES AND COMMIT ONE CRIME AFTER ANOTHER. AND IN THE PROCESS, THEY INFLICT BODILY HARM AND EVEN DEATH UPON INNOCENT LAW ABIDING AMERICANS. These are the immigrants that we the people DO NOT NEED! They should be deported. And once we get rid of these trouble makers, and issue green cards to illegal immigrants who have no trouble with the law then we should CRACK DOWN ON IMMIGRANTS WHO COME TO THIS COUNTRY ILLEGALLY. The immigration laws in effect must be strictly adhered to and the borders must be sealed. Why? To discourage the entry of illegal aliens, AND TO SAFEGUARD OUR NATION FROM TERRORIST ATTACKS. It is not inconceivable for a terrorist to enter this nation undetected, and then goes to one of our cities and detonates a portable nuke. THIS SCENARIO IS SCARY AND HORRIFYING AT THE VERY LEAST. And if you consider me a bigot for my opinion, that is your opinion. I am a concerned American citizen of foreign descent. I welcome people from other nations who are decent and law abiding and want to come here for a better way of life. BUT I OPPOSE ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS WHO HAVE NO RESPECT FOR OUR NATION AND OUR LAWS, and they are out there!

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  • From frisk@gmail.com on No Worker Is Illegal!

    Nice analysis…A related article:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/25/AR2006032500219.html

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on A spectre is haunting Europe

    Hi Sanjeev:Thanks..Yes I agree with you, but please visit http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2006/03/336061.html for the pics..
    About the demo in Orissa, I shall post them sometime soon..

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  • From animesh@hotmail.com on Recalling Bhagat Singh

    What a letter. On today’s date, it sounds unbelievable…! Where from one can get that book?

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  • From on Sarkozy must go. Chirac must apologize. Mainland France must evolve.

    […] lacks and the Muslims were being systematically deprived of what has been their overdue. Of course the skepticism was thus because the protestors were immigrant youths who took to the s […]

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  • From on Burn! Paris! Burn! The racist French must amend ways

    […] s thrive on racial discriminations. And Europe provides the recent most glaring example. In November 2005, when a huge number of young people from the minority communities protested […]

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  • From nelson@hotmail.com on Overheard Development of India

    I love this line: “I am not open to marketplace of imperialistic ideas.”Sounds like, this is a “Bazaar of Organic Products only”.
    I am now subscribing to your atomfeeds. Keep posting, my man!

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  • From blogsaswat@gmail.com on Overheard Development of India

    I am certainly not comfortable playing the mud and getting dirty, but here is my shot at that if it brings you some light.Imperialists do not invent toys. Working class people do. Else, we would not have had Sputnik as the first satelite. And where have I used “evil, selfish innovators”, I do not know. I am not biased against you. Hope you will reciprocate similarly.
    Secondly, about financial aid. I guess you are exhibiting your ignorance. Financial aids are like any other aids from the first world. They are no aids. They are loans. And they have interest rates. But even before discussing them, you should have looked at the justification behind $800 per credit education. Maybe you are rich enough. I am too much in debt! And there is no such thing as treats of Uncle Sam. Sounds like Marie Antoinette throwing cakes at people hungry for bread!
    And about stealing: Oh no, I use as much as the Open source movement allows me to. By the way, did you know Internet and more so, blog is not the property of any entrepreneurs….:) I have a lot to thank Stallman for his philosophies. Welcome to Free Software. Translated, it means own what you should. Its not stealing, for your information.
    thanks for visiting…
    And here is one more disclaimer. There are many Left-bashing sites available online. Please have a ball there. I am not open to marketplace of imperialistic ideas. Enjoy the champagne!

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  • From moo@dev.null on Overheard Development of India

    Too bad the technology and toys you use to disseminate your views wouldn’t be in place were it not for those evil, selish innovators, entrepreneurs and imperialists. Also, correct me if I am wrong, but given your background, I suspect you are comfortably sucking financial aid off the teats of Uncle Sam as you write this. I wonder what you tell yourself when you look yourself in the mirror– that you are stealing back some of the wealth stolen from you long back? Uh oh! Now that would be reason befitting an apparatchik.

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  • From blogsaswat@gmail.com on Overheard Development of India

    Thanks, Vikas. These thoughts just came instantly. Glad that you liked them.Please also know that I really admire your work on the Kamat portal. And I frequent it every so often…

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  • From nospam@hotmail.com on Overheard Development of India

    Nice. Sounds just like the conversations I have with my mother…

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  • From saswatblog@gmail.com on Overheard Development of India

    thanks.James Bond was popular in India during Cold War as he was saving the world from Communism. Now that he is engaged in saving the world from Terrorism, its not so much talked about anymore…in countries which are already willing partners..

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  • From animesh@hotmail.com on Goal-setting for Indian Economy

    Read the rediff story as well. I didnt quite get what ganguly wanted to say. Anyway rediff is a neo-con corporate. What else do you expect of the guest writers there. Just like the telegraph writers…they have a fancy for dollars…
    Carry on the good work, Shaswat.

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