All posts tagged: Eurocentrism

Nobel Intentions

At first glance, the Eurocentrism surrounding European Union winning the Nobel Peace Prize is probably not as alarming, considering that of all the 124 awarded individuals and organizations till date, 48 laureates have been from Western Europe alone. Matter of concern is a growing acceptance in our times that militarism is the new peace – a belief system made credible through this annual farce, coveted and venerable. Nobel Peace Prize committee has invariably rewarded imperialists, militarists and anticommunists. But it used to be a surreptitious affair. If the segregationist FW de Clarke needed to be rewarded, Nelson Mandela was invited to share the stage for his anti-colonial struggles. If the warmongering Kissinger was recognized for his brutality, at least Le Duc Tho was hesitatingly informed as a winner. When Mother Teresa was awarded the prize, she was not really projected as an anticommunist Albanian although it was clearly evident. Or the last time there were debates around the Peace Prize, Barack Obama had not yet unleashed his imperialistic tactics. In a way, Nobel Peace Prize …

Vaclav Havel :: Freedom Fighter or Militarist Capitalist?

The biggest myths perpetuated in the history of political economic analysis are the established contradistinctions between ‘democracy’ and ‘dictatorship’. Based on outlined differences, democracy is canonized as the opposite model of political governance to what is disgraced as dictatorship. And with this logic in place, Vaclav Havel is glorified to be a “freedom fighter” of his land, and Kim Jong-il is denounced as a dictator who throttled freedom in his country. It may be an irony that both these leaders died around the same time, but what is way bigger a concern is the manner in which they are being judged as historical subjects. In a corporate media culture that actively moulds our everyday thought processes through news contents, it is necessary to pause awhile, and dissect such enormous conclusions and examine if the impositions of such documented views are merely hasty, or purely methodical. For history is not just a body of collective knowledge compiled for posterity, but more importantly, critical investigations into historical scholarships instill the more necessary weapons in the minds of …

Free Market War on Gaddafi: Unjust, but Natural

By Saswat Pattanayak The war against Libya is a continued assault on part of the imperialist and rogue nations of the First World against the champions of anti-imperialism, anti-colonialism and progressive socialism of the Third World. Contrary to corporate media spins, the war is neither about oil money, nor about installing democracy. It is neither about the rebel uprising in the Arab world, nor about merely ending a dictatorial regime. The war against Libya is an attack on every remnant of collective human aspiration for freedom, peace, justice and equality. The war against Libya is a war against every future possibility that can enable international solidarities among peoples who envision a better world that belongs not to oligarchs and media monopolists, but is shaped up by the ideas of the internationalists, the pan-Africanists. Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s demand for the United States of Africa does not manifest in a Utopia. Quite the opposite: it is a scathing indictment of an unequal world whose mammoth immoralities are deep-rooted in an oppressed Africa. The only way the world’s …

Assange: Myths, Hypes and Truths

“All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out.” (I. F. Stone) In many ways, Julian Assange is the “Izzy” of new journalism. Like Stone, Assange has not flinched from sharing uncomfortable truths that can embolden the people to fight the power. Stone used to prove why reporters were not supposed to be glorified stenographers; Assange likewise demonstrates how journalists are not meant to be subsumed under patriotic obligations. And like Izzy Stone, since Assange knows the hashish whereabouts, he must meet the shared fate: just as the former was decried as the unAmerican scribe spying for the Soviets, Assange must gracefully accept his disrepute, of being the principal abuser of the Western espionage principles. The need to analyze Assange vis-a-vis Stone is to pose at least two critical questions. First, are these instances of two brilliant minds serving public causes that of the journalists-turned-spies; or must journalists fundamentally emerge as spies in order to serve the public well? Secondly, are the news not in …